Posts Tagged tedxchange

Explore the future of health and development September 20, 2010 at TEDxFoggyBottom!

September 16th, 2010

By: Brian Shaw

Ten years have passed since the inception of the Millennium Develop Goals. Great progress has been made; in fact, the world as a whole is on track to reduce poverty in half by 2015, which is a tremendous achievement. However, in many areas there is still a long way to go. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon recently remarked “The MDGs are difficult and ambitious, but doable.”

With only five years left in the original timeline to achieve the MDGs, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is convening the world’s leaders in New York next week to review the progress made and to call for renewed attention and commitment. Melinda Gates along with other world health luminaries will be working together with TED to reflect on the MDGs after ten years, and to look forward to the next five. Communities around the world will gather at satellite events to watch this symposium and to discuss in their own communities the way forward.

Read more: Explore the future of health and development September 20, 2010 at TEDxFoggyBottom!

Access to medication is a start, but long term change is needed for the poor

September 15th, 2010

Today marks Day 3 of the Center for High Impact Philanthropys special series on NTDs. The post below focuses on prevention and treatment of NTDs:

Reprinted with permission from the Center for High Impact Philanthropy.

The Clinton Global Initiative, UN Summit on Millennium Development Goals, and TEDxChange are only one week away. We present this series of five daily blogs on Neglected Tropical Diseases as an example of an area where philanthropists can make a big social impact. This is the third in a series of five posts that look at the impact of neglected tropical diseases and why philanthropists focused on health may be interested. In the previous blog, we saw how cost-effective treatment can be for some neglected tropical diseases. Those types of interventions are available right now. However, investments are also needed to treat the root causes of these diseases in order to produce long term elimination.

Nyakeir, a young girl from Southern Sudan describes what a difference sight-saving surgery can have for the treatment of blinding trachoma.

“Now since my surgery, I have been telling everyone I see suffering with trichiasis that they should go to the clinic and be helped. Now that I can see, I told my family that I want to go to school and become a successful person. I want to be an example to others who are suffering from trachoma, to show them that they can be treated and live a successful life.”1

NTD Snapshot2

Read more: Access to medication is a start, but long term change is needed for the poor

For neglected tropical diseases, pocket change goes a long way

September 14th, 2010

Continuing with their series on NTDs as mentioned in yesterdays post, here is the latest installment from the Center for High Impact Philanthropys special feature on NTDs:

Reprinted with permission from the Center for High Impact Philanthropy.

by impactsp2

The Clinton Global Initiative, UN Summit on Millennium Development Goals, and TEDxChange are only one week away. We present this series of five daily blogs on Neglected Tropical Diseases as an example of an area where philanthropists can make a big social impact. This is the second in a series of five posts that look at the impact of neglected tropical diseases and why philanthropists focused on health may be interested. In the previous blog, we introduced you to neglected tropical diseases and their devastating impact on the poor. Now, we’ll examine some of the inexpensive treatments that are already available.

In order to control neglected tropical diseases, we need both short-term interventions as well as long-term investments in health infrastructure such as clean water and sanitation systems.

Neglected diseases are often referred to as “tool ready” or “tool deficient”.1 Tool ready diseases have treatments that are available now. They are often inexpensive and simple. In addition, implementation strategies are feasible, but are not being adequately implemented. Tool deficient diseases do not yet have readily available treatment options that are safe and effective and more research is required.

Read more: For neglected tropical diseases, pocket change goes a long way

NTDs Featured on Center for High Impact Philanthropy!

September 13th, 2010

The Center for High Impact Philanthropy, a part of the University of Pennsylvania,is doing a five-part series this week in anticipation of the upcoming Millennium Development Goals Summit that will take place early next week. End the Neglect will showcase each part of the series:

Reprinted with permission from the Center for High Impact Philanthropy.

What are neglected tropical diseases? (Part 1)

The Clinton Global Initiative, UN Summit on Millennium Development Goals, and TEDxChange are only one week away. We present this series of five daily blogs on Neglected Tropical Diseases as an example of an area where philanthropists can make a big social impact. This is the first in a series of five posts that look at the impact of neglected tropical diseases and why philanthropists focused on health may be interested. Read more: NTDs Featured on Center for High Impact Philanthropy!

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  • About
    • The Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases is a major advocacy and resource mobilization initiative of the Sabin Vaccine Institute dedicated to raising the awareness, political will, and funding necessary to control and eliminate the most common neglected tropical diseases (NTDs)--a group of disabling, disfiguring, and deadly diseases affecting more than 1.4 billion people worldwide living on less than $1.25 a day.
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    • Weekly Blog round up is up on End the Neglect, see what we wrote about this week! by Global_Network about 3 days ago